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Today History 11 April: Yes, today is the birth anniversary of social reformer Jyotirao Govindrao Phule.

Jyotiba Phul was a famous social reformer of Maharashtra of his time.  He was born in 1827 in a Mali family of Satara district.  The social status of the Mali caste was considered low.  His full name was Jyotirao Govindrao Phule.  His father's name was Govindrao Phule.  He was a vegetable seller in Pune.  His family was originally from Katgun village in Satara district.  His family was called Gorhe.  His grandfather's name was Shetiba Gorhe.  They came to Pune and settled down.  His father-fodder used to do the work of delivering flowers to the Peshwa;  Hence his family name was Phule.  His mother died when he was only nine months old.


Full Name : Jyotirao Govindrao Phule

Father Name : Govindrao Phule

Grandfather Name : Shetiba Gorhe

Address : Katgun village in Satara district


Today History 11 April: Yes, today is the birth anniversary of social reformer Jyotirao Govindrao Phule.

Today History 11 April: Yes, today is the birth anniversary of social reformer Jyotirao Govindrao Phule.
Jyotiba Phul was a famous social reformer of Maharashtra of his time.  He was born in 1827 in a Mali family of Satara district. (Example Image) (image credit: google play books)

Jyotiba Phul was a famous social reformer of Maharashtra of his time.  He was born in 1827 in a Mali family of Satara district.  The social status of the Mali caste was considered low.  His full name was Jyotirao Govindrao Phule.  His father's name was Govindrao Phule, he was a vegetable seller in Pune.  His family was originally from Katgun village in Satara district.  His family was called Gorhe.  His grandfather's name was Shetiba Gorhe.  They came to Pune and settled down.  His father-fodder used to deliver flowers to the Peshwa, hence his family name Phule.  His mother died when he was only nine months old.


 Due to weak financial condition, Jyotirao had to leave his studies only after primary education.  He had to work in the field with his father.  He was a very smart boy.  Seeing his intensity, one of his Christians and a Muslim neighbor persuaded his father to allow Jyotirao to complete his studies from the Scottish Mission High School in Pune.  He completed his schooling in 1847.  It was here that he befriended a Brahmin boy, Sadashiv Govande, who lived for the rest of his life.


persisted.  He had two more Brahmin friends named Moro Vithal Walvekar and Sakharam Yashwant Paranjpe.  These two friends continued to work together with Jyotirao even further.  At the young age of 12, Jyotirao was married to Savitri Bai.  Jyotirao did not do a government job even after completing his schooling.


An event of 1848 changed the course of his life.  them one Invited to the wedding of a Brahmin friend.  one of the groom in the procession When the relative came to know that he belonged to a lower caste, he insulted.  Jyotirao came back from the procession, but his mind I was filled with bitterness.  He condemned the caste system and social evils.


 Decided to raise voice against


Jyotirao read Thomas Paine's famous book 'Rights of Man', which had a great impact on him.  Because of this book, an inclination towards social equality and justice was born in him.  On the basis of personal experience, he became a staunch opponent of caste system and caste discrimination.  He started a campaign to end social inequality.


Phule is distinguished from his contemporary social reformers because other social reformers were associated with social issues like family and marriage.  Jyotirao focused on the caste system and women's rights.  He found that the root of the caste system is very strong and it is very important to eradicate it.  He also tried for the upliftment of the untouchables and poor peasants who were the victims of the tyranny of Brahmins and upper caste people.


His efforts angered the Brahmin community, but his Brahmin friends always remained with him.  Jyotirao understood that the upliftment of the lower caste people and women could not take place without educating them.


Jyotirao started teaching his wife Savitri Bai.  1848 He started a school for girls.  No one was ready to teach lower caste girls, so his wife took over the job.  He then opened schools for two other so-called lower castes, the Mahars and the Mangs.


Angry Brahmins started spreading false propaganda that Jyotirao worked for Christian missionaries.  When Savitri Bai went to teach school, Brahmins used to throw stones to stop her.  When this did not work out, he threatened Jyotirao's father.  Under his pressure, Jyotirao's father asked his son and daughter-in-law to stop the work of social reform or leave their house.  Jyotirao and Savitri chose to leave the house.


Due to lack of funds, his school was later closed.

Done.  After a few days his Brahmin friends Sadashiv Ballal Govande and With the help of Moro Vithal Valvekar, he started school again.


Jyotirao felt that the primary education sector of the common people in Bombay Presidency was very neglected, due to which poverty persists and their dependence on the priority upper castes in schools and colleges remains.  Because of this Brahmins used to hold all the high positions in government offices.  Jyotirao blamed the British government for spending more money on higher education


Their main target was the Brahmins.  Jyotirao used to criticize him a lot.  In his opinion Brahmins were the root of all social evils.  His critics started saying that he only expressed the views of Christian missionaries about Indian society.  Though Jyotiba's ideas were original to him and his concern for the oppressed lower castes who had been oppressed for centuries was natural.


Phule was also moved by the plight of widows and orphans and started an orphanage to improve their condition.  The strange thing is that many upper caste widows also came to live in his orphanage.


Disclaimer: All article Credit Google Play Book, book name is - Jotiba Phule. This article is written for the purpose of entertainment and education of the audience.  Our website does not claim the absolute truthfulness of any of the events described in this article.


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